Smart bandage uses nanosensors to track how a wound is healing

Smart bandage uses nanosensors to track how a wound is healing

Researchers at the United Kingdom’s Swansea University have developed a new smart bandage capable of tracking how a wound is healing and sending that data back to doctors via 5G technology.

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Pirate Bay Founder Launches Anonymous Domain Registration Service

Pirate Bay Founder Launches Anonymous Domain Registration Service

An anonymous reader quotes a report from TorrentFreak: Former Pirate Bay spokesperson and co-founder Peter Sunde has just announced his latest venture. Keeping up his fight for privacy on the Internet, he’s launching a new company called Njalla, that helps site operators to shield their identities from prying eyes. The name Njalla refers to the traditional hut that Sami people use to keep predators at bay. It’s built on a tall stump of a tree or pole and is used to store food or other goods. On the Internet, Njalla helps to keep people’s domain names private. While anonymizer services aren’t anything new, Sunde’s company takes a different approach compared to most of the competition. With Njalla, customers don’t buy the domain names themselves, they let the company do it for them. This adds an extra layer of protection but also requires some trust. A separate agreement grants the customer full usage rights to the domain. This also means that people are free to transfer it elsewhere if they want to.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft’s Skype Is Most Used Messaging Service For Cyber Criminals, Study Finds

Microsoft’s Skype Is Most Used Messaging Service For Cyber Criminals, Study Finds

chicksdaddy quotes a report from The Security Ledger: Cyber criminals lurk in the dark recesses of the internet, striking at random and then disappearing into the virtual ether. But when they want to talk shop with their colleagues, they turn to Redmond, Washington-based Microsoft and its Skype communications tools, according to an analysis by the firm Flashpoint. Mentions of different platforms were used as a proxy for gauging interest in and use of these messaging services. Flashpoint analysts looked, especially, for invitations to continue conversation outside of cyber criminal marketplaces, like references to ICQ accounts or other platforms. The survey results show that, out of a population of around 80 instant messenger platforms and protocols, a short list of just five platforms accounts for between 80% and 90% of all mentions within the cyber underground. Of those, Microsoft’s Skype was the chat king. It ranked among the top five platforms across all language groups. That, despite the platform’s lack of end-to-end encryption or forward secrecy features and evidence, courtesy of NSA hacker Edward Snowden, that U.S. spies may have snooped on Skype video calls in recent years, The Security Ledger reports. The conclusion: while security is a priority amongst thieves, it isn’t the sole concern that cyber criminals and their associates have. In fact, sophisticated hacking communities like those in Russia to continue to rely on legacy platforms like ICQ when provably more secure alternatives exist. The reason? Business. “These cyber criminals have a lot of different options that they’re juggling and a lot of factors that weigh on their options,” said Leroy Terrelonge III, the Director of Middle East and Africa Research at Flashpoint. “We might suspect that cyber criminals use the most secure means of communication all the time, that’s not what our research showed.”

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The CIA is hunting for an insider who gave top-secret files to WikiLeaks

The CIA is hunting for an insider who gave top-secret files to WikiLeaks

The Central Intelligence Agency has launched a manhunt for a traitor within its ranks, after what has been known as one the worst security breaches in the organization’s history, CBS News reported on Wednesday.

A joint investigation of the CIA and the FBI is underway to examine how thousands of top-secret files were published in March by WikiLeaks, the controversial organization that releases classified material, by an alleged CIA employee or contractor who operated a tool normally used by the CIA to infiltrate various electronic devices — from smart phones, smart televisions, and computers.

The breach has been referred as “Vault 7” by WikiLeaks.

The CIA did not state publicly how or when the information was stolen. However, it said that the insider had physical access to obtain the files, and that most of it was stored in a “highly secure section,” CBS reported. 

CIA director Mike Pompeo recently slammed WikiLeaks for playing a role in the dissemination of the files.

“It is time to call out WikiLeaks for what it really is: A non-state hostile intelligence service often abetted by state actors like Russia,” he said, referring to the organization’s possible ties to the Kremlin.

Pompeo continued to rail against WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange, asserting that the Russian military “had used WikiLeaks” to release the Democratic National Committee’s emails that has since fueled allegations of Russia’s involvement in the 2016 US presidential election. He also added that RT, a media network from Russia that has offices in the US, was “Russia’s primary propaganda outlet,” and that it “has actively collaborated with WikiLeaks,” according to The Wall Street Journal.

The organization itself has been reluctant to release its source. “The archive appears to have been circulated among former US government hackers and contractors in an unauthorized manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive,” read a statement.

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