Studies show Google Assistant is still miles ahead of Alexa and Siri

Studies show Google Assistant is still miles ahead of Alexa and Siri


If you’re lucky enough to have more than one smart assistant in your life, the results of two studies this week probably won’t come as much of a surprise to you. For everyone else: just buy a device with Google Assistant already. The studies: This week we saw not one, but two studies detailing Google’s dominance in the virtual assistant space. The first, from Stone Temple Consulting, is a follow-up to the same study from last year. In it, researchers compared various assistants on 5,000 different queries, judging each by the number answered as well as their accuracy rates. The…

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Russia asks Google and Apple to remove Telegram from their app stores

Russia asks Google and Apple to remove Telegram from their app stores


It’s fair to say that in light of the Syria situation, the Skripal poisoning, and yet another government-backed cyberattack, Russia’s relationship with the west isn’t particularly warm right now. But that hasn’t stopped the country from formally asking Google and Apple to remove the Telegram app from their respective app…

HP launches Chromebook x2, a Chrome OS detachable with keyboard cover and stylus, 12.3-inch IPS display, 4GB RAM, 32GB storage, 13MP camera, starting at $599

HP launches Chromebook x2, a Chrome OS detachable with keyboard cover and stylus, 12.3-inch IPS display, 4GB RAM, 32GB storage, 13MP camera, starting at $599


Valentina Palladino / Ars Technica:

HP launches Chromebook x2, a Chrome OS detachable with keyboard cover and stylus, 12.3-inch IPS display, 4GB RAM, 32GB storage, 13MP camera, starting at $599  —  Pushing the idea that Chrome OS is for more than just classwork.  —  Acer ushered in the “Chromebook tablet” …

Google Seeks To Limit ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ By Claiming It’s Journalistic

Google Seeks To Limit ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ By Claiming It’s Journalistic

“In the first ‘right to be forgotten’ case to reach England’s High Court, two men are fighting to keep their past crimes out of Google’s search results, and the tech giant is fighting back by claiming it’s ‘journalistic.'” Chava Gourarie reports via Columbia Journalism Review: The case, which is actually two nearly identical cases, involves two businessmen who were both convicted of white-collar crimes in the ’90s, and requested that Google delist several URLs referencing their convictions, including news articles. When Google denied their requests, they sued under a 2014 European Union ruling which established the right of individuals to have information delisted from search indexes under certain conditions. In its defense, Google has argued that it should be protected under an exception for journalism because it provides access to journalistic content. Even as a legal sleight of hand, the argument is quite a departure from Google’s customary efforts to present itself as a disinterested arbiter of information, a position that has become more untenable with time.

Gareth Corfield, a reporter for The Register who covered the cases from the courtroom, said it’s disingenuous of Google to put on the mantle of journalism only when it suits them. “They’ve gone through great lengths to say they don’t make any editorial judgement in processing results,” Corfield said, but “it now wants you to believe it is on a par with journalism.” As the first case to test the “right to be forgotten” in England’s High Court, its outcome will likely set some ground rules in the roiling debate between personal privacy and freedom of expression on the internet. Google’s sudden identification with journalism may be a legal gambit, but it could have far-reaching effects across the landscape of data protection laws.

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