Facebook is taking on LinkedIn by letting businesses post job listings (FB, MSFT)

Facebook is taking on LinkedIn by letting businesses post job listings (FB, MSFT)

Facebook is going after LinkedIn, Glassdoor, and other job listing sites.

Starting Friday, US businesses on Facebook will be able to post open job listings natively to their pages and in the News Feed.

Facebook’s VP of Ads, Andrew Bosworth, told Business Insider that the feature is rolling out after a Facebook-commissioned survey of small business owners in the US that showed the hardest problem they had is finding the right people to hire.

“They actually put that ahead of finding new customers and getting sales,” he said.

Once a Facebook page posts a job listing directly to its page, anyone who visits that page will see the option to apply. To speed up the process, Facebook will offer to autofill application information, like a person’s name and location, from an applicant’s profile. Employers will be able to respond to applicants through Messenger.

Facebook will let businesses pay to boost the reach of their listings to specific demographics, and listings will also show up in the News Feed for people who have liked a business’s page. 

The new jobs feature will pit Facebook against LinkedIn, the social network for professionals, which was recently acquired by Microsoft. 

Despite the prevalence of existing job sites, Bosworth said that Facebook saw an opportunity to capitalize on the behavior that was already happening on its network.

“Pages were already making these posts, they were just doing it ad-hoc,” he said. “We’re bringing a little structure to it… It’s a super lightweight approach to try and connect employers and employees.”

A new “Jobs’ tab is being added under the “More section” of the Facebook mobile app, and listings will be accessible via Facebook.com/jobs on desktop computers.

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Russian regulator told Apple and Google to remove LinkedIn app from App Store and Google Play; app is no longer available for download in Russia

Russian regulator told Apple and Google to remove LinkedIn app from App Store and Google Play; app is no longer available for download in Russia


New York Times:

Russian regulator told Apple and Google to remove LinkedIn app from App Store and Google Play; app is no longer available for download in Russia  —  WASHINGTON — Smartphone users in Russia can no longer download the LinkedIn app on iPhone or Android devices, following a similar move in China to block The New York Times app on iPhones.

Bill Gates says a Microsoft-owned LinkedIn could be as valuable as the Facebook news feed

Bill Gates says a Microsoft-owned LinkedIn could be as valuable as the Facebook news feed

Wall Street is cautiously optimistic about Microsoft’s $26 billion mega-buy of professional social network LinkedIn, and now Bill Gates is adding his support too.

I think it’s a great transaction. LinkedIn brings in a lot,” Gates told Bloomberg’s Erik Schatzker in an on-screen interview.

The opportunity, Gates says, is to combine Microsoft’s productivity expertise with LinkedIn’s social networking know-how to become the center of people’s professional lives.

“If we can make that as valuable as say the Facebook feed in the social world, that’s huge value creation, and that’ll happen over a period of years,” Gates says.

Gates says that Microsoft is already an “expert in software and managing those audiences,” and can now use the LinkedIn news feed to deliver a professional feed on everything that’s happening inside and outside their company, tracking the skills they need to stay competitive. 

“I certainly think the value of the two companies combined is greater than the two by themselves but I love the idea that the market wants us to show that,” Gates says.

Gates was reportedly the voice of dissent that killed a proposed $8 billion Microsoft bid for hot chat startup Slack, on the grounds that Microsoft could build something better in-house with Skype.

In that light, for Gates to throw his support behind Microsoft’s $26 billion LinkedIn deal, seen by some to be a too-steep premium, there might just be something for shareholders to celebrate here.

SEE ALSO: This is why Microsoft would have been crazy to sell the Xbox business

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