Mozilla Acquires Pocket and Its More Than 10 Million Users

Mozilla Acquires Pocket and Its More Than 10 Million Users

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Recode: Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox web browser, is buying Pocket, the read-it-later service, for an undisclosed amount. Pocket, which is described by Mozilla as its first strategic acquisition, will continue to operate as a Mozilla subsidiary. Founder Nate Weiner will continue to run Pocket, along with his team of about 25 people. Pocket, previously known as Read It Later, lets users bookmark articles, videos and other content to read or view later on the web or a mobile device. It’s great for things like saving offline copies of web articles to read on plane rides or subway commutes, especially where internet access is sparse. Pocket, which was founded in 2007, has more than 10 million monthly active users, according to a rep. That’s not bad, but suggests it’s still a fairly niche service, especially as big firms like Facebook and Apple build simple “reading list” features into their platforms.

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Mozilla launches Firefox Focus, a private web browser for iPhone

Mozilla launches Firefox Focus, a private web browser for iPhone

 The makers of Firefox are today introducing a new mobile web browser for iOS users that puts private browsing at the forefront of the user experience. Called Firefox Focus, the mobile browser by default blocks ad trackers, and erases your browsing history, including also your passwords and cookies. The end result is simplified browser that may load web pages more quickly, the company… Read More

Mozilla, Microsoft, Amazon, Google, and Others Form ‘Alliance For Open Media’

Mozilla, Microsoft, Amazon, Google, and Others Form ‘Alliance For Open Media’

BrianFagioli tips news that Mozilla, Microsoft, Google, Cisco, Intel, Amazon, and Netflix are teaming up to create the Alliance for Open Media, “an open-source project that will develop next-generation media formats, codecs and technologies in the public interest.” Several of these companies have been working on this problem alone: Mozilla started Daala, Google has VP9 and VP10, and Cisco just recently announced Thor. Amazon and Netflix, of course, are major suppliers of online video streaming, so they have a vested interested in royalty-free codecs. They’re inviting others to join them — the more technology and patents they get on their side, the less likely they’ll run into the issues that Microsoft’s VC-1 and Google’s VP8 struggled with. “The Alliance will operate under W3C patent rules and release code under an Apache 2.0 license. This means all Alliance participants are waiving royalties both for the codec implementation and for any patents on the codec itself.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.