Microsoft’s Interest In Buying GitHub Draws Backlash From Developers

Microsoft’s Interest In Buying GitHub Draws Backlash From Developers

The supposed acquisition of popular code repository GitHub by Microsoft has drawn an unprecedented backlash from the developer community. Over the weekend, after Bloomberg reported that the two companies could make the announcement as soon as Monday, hundreds of developers took to forums and social media to express their disappointment, with many saying that they would be leaving the platform if the deal goes through. So why so much outrage? In a conversation with Slashdot, software developer and student Sean said that he believes a deal of such capacity would be bad for the open source community. “They’ve shown time and time again that they can’t be trusted,” he said. Sean and many other believe that Microsoft would eventually start telemetry program on the code repository. “Aside from Microsoft not being trustworthy to the open source community, I’m sure they’ll add tracking and possibly even ads to all the sites within GitHub. As well as possibly use it to push LinkedIn (which they own),” he said. Ryan Hoover, the founder of ProductHunt, wrote on Sunday, “Anecdotally, the developer community is very unapproving of this move. I’m curious how Microsoft manages this and how GitHub changes (or doesn’t change).” Even as Microsoft has “embraced” the open source community in the recent years (under the leadership of Mr. Nadella), for many developers, it will take time — if at all — to forget the company’s past closed-ecosystem approach. Just this weekend, a developer accused Microsoft of stealing his code. A petition that seeks to “stop Microsoft from buying Github” had garnered support from more than 300 developers. Prominent developer Andre Staltz said, “If you’re still optimistic about the Microsoft-GitHub acquisition, consider this: They didn’t ask your opinion not even a single bit, even though it was primarily your commits, stars, and repositories which made GH become a valuable platform.” More importantly, if the comments left on Slashdot, Reddit, and HackerNews, places that overwhelmingly count developers and other IT industry experts among their audience, are anything to go by, Microsoft better has a good plan on how it intends to operate GitHub after the buyout. Security reporter Catalin Cimpanu said, “LinkedIn has turned into a slow-loading junk after the Microsoft acquisition. I can only imagine what awaits GitHub.” On his part, Mat Velloso, who is technical advisor to CTO at Microsoft, said, “I don’t think people understand how many of us at Microsoft love GitHub to the bottom of our hearts. If anybody decided to mess with that community, there would be a riot to say the least.”

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Uber Facing Ban In Turkey After Erdogan Backs Taxis

Uber Facing Ban In Turkey After Erdogan Backs Taxis

An anonymous reader quotes a report from SBS: Uber faces being banned in Turkey after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said the ride-hailing app was “finished” on Saturday following an intense lobbying campaign from Istanbul taxi drivers. Erdogan’s comments, in a late-night speech Friday in Istanbul, came after the government agreed new rules that are expected to severely complicate Uber’s operations in Turkey. Drivers of Istanbul’s yellow taxis have over the last months waged an intense campaign to have Uber banned, saying the company is eating into their business without having a proper legal basis for work. “This thing emerged called Uber or Muber or whatever,” said Erdogan. “But this issue is now finished. It’s over now. Our Prime Minister (Minali Yildirim) made the announcement. We have our system of taxis,” he said.
“Yildirim’s government last month issue a directive sharply hiking fines and threatened to blacklist companies whose vehicles illegally work as taxis,” reports SBS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.